732.847.3163

Common Issues

Disc

Posted by admin on January 17, 2014

Disc Displacement

Disc displacement occurs when a disc has fallen out of its normal alignment in the backbone (spine). The disc provides cushioning and flexibility from daily activity while keeping the bones (vertebrae) separated. When a disc becomes displaced, its function can be compromised and daily tasks can become painful from lack of cushioning. Most frequently, disc displacement occurs in the lower back (lumbar spine). 

Herniated Disc

A herniated disc occurs when a disc in the backbone (spine) becomes damaged or ruptured. Discs provide flexibility in the back (spine) and act as shock absorbers.  The material inside the disc, once no longer confined to the normal boundaries of the disc, can irritate the surrounding tissue and can cause pain.  When a disc cannot provide flexibility and absorb shock, the bones in the spine (vertebrae) are not supported, and this can potentially lead to pain.  Symptoms may include muscle spasms, numbness, weakness, and pain and tingling in the limbs. 

hernaited_disc.jpg

normal_disc.jpg

Similarly, disc displacement occurs when a disc has fallen out of its normal alignment in the backbone (spine). The disc provides cushioning and flexibility from daily activity while keeping the bones (vertebrae) separated. When a disc becomes displaced, its function can be compromised and daily tasks can become painful from lack of cushioning or altered mechanics. Most frequently, disc displacement occurs in the lower back (lumbar spine).

Degenerative Disc Disease

Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) occurs in the back/neck (spine) as the discs age, beginning the process of degeneration. The discs in your back (spine) provide cushioning for the bones (vertebrae) above and below them.  As discs begin to deteriorate, they often lose height, elasticity, and fluid. Small tears or cracks may appear in the outer layers of the discs, and can be associated with pain. This can compromise their cushioning function, leaving the bones in the back (vertebrae in the spine) with more limited support.  Still, it is estimated that at least 30% of individuals not exhibiting related symptoms have abnormal imaging studies and it is therefore important to treat the patient, not the imaging study.  Some features associated with pain related to the disc itself are coughing or sneezing, and pain that is worse in a seated position.

Degenerative_disc_disease_1.jpg                 Degenerative_disc_disease_.jpg